Master of Construction (MConstr)

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Lead the world of construction

Become a world-leading construction specialist, with Massey University’s Master of Construction. It is the only degree in New Zealand focused on construction.

What is it like?

The Master of Construction at Massey University is a unique degree, focusing on building your in-depth knowledge of specific aspects of construction. It is the only postgraduate qualification in New Zealand whose courses are specifically developed for construction. You will still gain from Massey’s expertise in related areas such as engineering and business, but always with a construction view.

This masters qualification builds on Massey’s bachelors degree in construction – the only one offered in New Zealand.

Is it right for me?

You may be working in the construction industry and want to know more about specific aspects. Or you may work in another area (like law) and wish to learn more about related construction specialities (construction law). This degree will give you specific, tailored, focused learning to help you gain in-depth knowledge in aspects of construction.

World-leading expertise

Massey University construction staff have a wide range of industry and research experience. You will work with people who know how the industry works and what potential employers are looking for. The Master of Construction will help you become a construction professional, with relevant knowledge and skills the industry needs.

Industry-relevant research

Massey University has extensive contacts with the construction industry and we work to ensure that our programme is kept up to date and relevant to that industry.

You will conduct a research project of 45 credits or more as part of your study. We encourage that this research focuses on an industry relevant to your own career, giving you direct and immediate benefit. If you have come straight from undergraduate study you can take advantage of our extensive industry relationships to also develop a relevant project that will enhance your career prospects.

A sustainable view

The themes of sustainability and productivity run through all our construction courses. We have sustainability specialists who ensure that these increasingly-important views of construction are always considered through study and projects.

Become a construction specialist

When you study towards Massey’s Master of Construction you will learn the detail you need to become a construction professional with expertise in:

  • Construction technology
  • Cost and financial aspects of construction
  • Legal aspects of construction projects
  • Management of construction projects

Future projects

There is massive work to be done and there is high demand at all levels of work in the construction industry – ranging from construction tradespeople to construction professionals.

  • In Auckland alone there have been suggestions that with the estimated population growth of close to a further million people, another 300,000 new homes need to be built. Assuming each new house costs $300,000.00 to build, that translates to $90 billion worth of work.
  • Also in Auckland a new convention centre, rail links, a second harbor crossing (tunnel or bridge), expansion of the dedicated northern bus way, additional commercial projects (shopping and offices), recreational projects including the new pool at North Harbour stadium and the AUT-Millenium Institute of Sports and Health expansions, the need to work out costs of construction for insurance valuation purposes, strengthening buildings that do not comply with minimum earthquake requirements, and the extensive rectification of leaky buildings.
  • Construction work is projected to grow in Hamilton and Wellington and the major Christchurch rebuild post-earthquakes.

Flexible study mode

This qualification is available via distance, meaning you can study when and where it suits you, from where ever you live. We have students all over New Zealand and internationally. You can progress your career, while studying around your personal and work commitments.

A masters in a year

This degree is 120 credits, meaning you can complete in only one year full time. You can enter this programme if you have an approved four year degree, a three year degree and a postgraduate diploma, or a three year degree and two years relevant work experience.

Why postgraduate study?

Postgraduate study is hard work but hugely rewarding and empowering. The workload replicates the high-pressure environment of senior workplace roles.

Not just more of the same

Postgraduate study is not just ‘more of the same’ undergraduate study. Our experts are there to guide but if you have come from undergraduate study, you will find that postgraduate study demands more in-depth and independent study. It takes you to a new level in knowledge and expertise especially in planning and undertaking research.

A good fit if you:

  • Have a four-year construction degree or a three-year construction degree with work experience
  • Would like to specialise in or learn more about an area of construction
  • Would like to move up the career hierarchy
David Finnie
Master of Construction (Construction Law)
Graduating 2015
Construction lecturer, Otago Polytechnic

“I immediately recommend Massey University to anyone considering studying construction. It’s been an incredible journey and I can’t imagine any other university delivering programmes through distance study better than Massey…”

At Massey I had my experience of inquiry-based, learner-centered learning.  Rather than ‘feeding us Powerpoints’, my lecturer Naseem asked us to come up with a topic and write a journal-quality paper about it.  I initially panicked because I’d barely even written an academic essay!  However, we were guided us through our topics, how to write our papers, and where to find reference sources. My essay was published in the Australian Journal of Construction Economics in Building (AJCEB).  It was a life changing experience for me. It opened my eyes to academia and gave me a real passion for learning and teaching.   

I can’t speak highly enough of the specialist construction lecturers at Massey.  They are such high-calibre professionals and also so friendly and approachable.  Despite being involved in other work such as research, they always make teaching a priority, and make each student feel welcomed, included and special. 

Despite studying by distance, the use of online discussion forums and contact courses makes for excellent communication and I never felt isolated from other my lecturer or students.  

I know a number of other students who moved from other universities because of the lack of support and teaching inconsistencies. They found they were far more supported studying through distance study at Massey.

I use material I learnt in my studies at Massey every day. It not only taught me the subject material at a very high level, I’ve also learnt how to learn and how to teach, and how to perform as a professional.  Through studying construction at Massey University, I’ve re-written most of the material I teach and changed the way I teach it. 

Careers

You will be in demand

There is a shortage of enough qualified graduates with skills in this area - there is over $100 billion construction work (covering both building and infrastructure work) to be done in New Zealand alone over the next 30 years. Demand in many countries beyond New Zealand is even bigger.

Massive growth in the construction industry

The construction industry is a significant contributor to any country’s economy. It is often used as a catalyst industry to spur further economic growth because it has a ‘multiplier’ or knock-on effect on the rest of the economy.
The New Zealand construction industry is likely to face acute shortages. Consider the following:

  1. In Auckland alone there have been suggestions that with the estimated population growth of close to a further million people, another 300,000 new homes need to be built. Assuming each new house costs $300,000.00 to build, that translates to $90 billion worth of work.
  2. We then have to add to that the costs of the new convention centre at Sky City, the rail links proposed for Auckland, a second harbor crossing (tunnel or bridge), expansion of the dedicated northern bus way, additional commercial projects (shopping and offices) to cater for the additional population, additional recreational projects including the new pool at North Harbour stadium and the AUT-Millenium Institute of Sports and Health expansions including another Olympic-size pool, the need to work out costs of construction for insurance valuation purposes, the need to strengthen buildings that do not comply with minimum earthquake requirements, and the extensive rectification of leaky buildings around Auckland.

Then, going beyond Auckland, we need to add the costs of construction work projected to grow in Hamilton, Wellington post earthquake repairs, and the major Christchurch rebuild.

Earn more

A Ministry of Education report found that:

  • Earnings and employment rates increase with the level of qualification completed
  • Five years after leaving study, most young domestic graduates will be earning above the national median earnings
  • Young masters graduates earn 86 per cent more than the national median
  • Good careers are associated with better health, better wellbeing and more satisfying lives

World-leading lecturers and supervisors

Massey’s construction staff are internationally-renowned for their research and teaching and learning methods. You will be working with internationally-recognised specialists, for example:

Professor Robyn Phipps

Professor Phipps spent many years in architectural practice, working on a wide variety of residential, commercial and industrial projects, prior to joining Massey University.

Her interest and expertise is in healthy and sustainable buildings. This includes the health and environmental effects of domestic heating, design of healthy buildings, low energy buildings, ventilation in homes and schools, mould in buildings and health effects from fluorescent lighting. Her work has been published internationally. She is a co-director of a team that won the 2004 Prime Minister’s Science Prize for a Research Team for their transformational research on housing and health.

Prof Phipps is active in many groups. These include the Clean Air Society of Australia and New Zealand, the International Society for Indoor Air Quality and Climate and NERI - the National Energy Research Institute, Sustainable Cities Research consortium and the He Kainga Oranga Healthy Housing Research Group.

Join the engine of the new New Zealand
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